Month: April 2013


The Human Monster


In Dawn of the Dead, the zombies are caricatures of the living in their spiritlessness, but in almost every zombie narrative, another boundary between the human and the monster is blurred—the living are frequently shown to be more monstrous than the walking dead. The zombies certainly represent a serious external...

Zombies and Consumer culture


That the zombie is a reflections of modern man is apparent in Romero’s second installment of his zombie narratives, Dawn of the Dead (1978), where he “offers us a glimpse of a universe in which all spiritual values have been replaced by our awareness of the material realities of the...

Zombies ‘R Us


Hopefully, I have made the case that the modern zombie is a monster for our time.  Like all monsters, they challenge cultural identity, but these are our monsters—our identity. They are completely immanent; they possess no transcendent ability or power; they transgress immanent categories including between the self and the...

Heroism ain’t what it used to be


Beowulf and Achilles,  now those were heroes.  Even more recent literature has guys like Van Helsing and Aragorn.  In his treatment of the hero, Alsford says that a hero is “fundamentally oriented towards the other”; the hero “gives him or herself to the world” (29).  Zombie movies don’t have heroes...

Traditional Values: Consumed by the Zombie Horde


Not only is it difficult to attribute the term “evil” to this most modern of monsters, it is also difficult to attribute the term “good” to the “heroes” of the zombie movie.  In fact, the primary victim of the zombie horde, is not the humans that battle the undead for survival;...